Category Archives: Creative Journeys

Creative Personality: Jokotimi Of TMG Divas

Cutie alert!!! This creative person is into cuties, cuteness, and all things cute. We feature a brand that you can only love.

She is an entrepreneur who is conscious of the richness in the African heritage and she does her cute bit to promote it – yeah, couldn’t resist saying it one more time :D. You need to see the adorable models

She is part of the new crop of Creatives, who are not afraid to go head to head with the foreign brands as her pride in her Nigerian heritage shows through in her designs.

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Jokotimi Garba, a Lagosian married with two kids. I studied Mass Communication at the Lagos State University. I am very simple and fun to be with.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavor

At TMG Divas, we make beautiful and extraordinary clothes, shoes, slippers and sandals for children in African fabrics, especially Ankara material. The business name is coined from my daughter’s initials.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen?

Yes, I see myself as a creative person. It all started in 2013, I had a deep longing to make my children look good and dress uniquely at every outing and also to promote our African culture. I was tired of UK and US wears and I did something about it.

What source(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

I draw my inspiration from my children and my environment.

Describe your journey so far – How did you start/ get into what you do now?

My journey so far has been wonderful and encouraging. I have come in contact with great and wonderful people who appreciate what I do.

I started in 2013, I didn’t want a white collar job because I wanted to have enough time for my kids. I really wanted to do something different after graduating in 2011.

Did you receive any training?

I worked at GOP fashion house in Yaba during my Diploma days. I learnt one or two things about fashion whilst there.

Did you get discouraged at any point?

Yes, I got discouraged at some point because some people around me had many doubts about if the business would be successful.

What made you stick with it?

What kept me going was the fact that I had the conviction that it will work out, I knew what I wanted and I felt extremely excited within myself.

What sets your work apart from others in your niche?

My designs are unique and extraordinary. Moreso, the fact that I specialize in children clothes with matching shoes and accessories, all in indigenous fabric, gives me an edge.

Where do you plan to take this to?

I see TMG Divas becoming a household name. I see us receiving local and international awards for promoting African culture in children fashion.

We encourage collaboration on this forum, so what are your other areas of interest?

My other area of interest is in event planning and execution.

What hurdles have you encountered and how are you dealing with them?

Delivering orders to people in other cities like Abuja, Kaduna, Kano, Asaba, Port Harcourt, Oshogbo, Abeokuta and Ibadan was an issue. I had to discuss with some transportation companies, I pay them and they help me do deliveries to other states.

What habits of yours would you say contribute to your creative output?

My habit of being critical! I see everything wrong in what most tailors around sew for kids and I feel compelled to make it right.

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

There are so many creative people in Nigeria and I am impressed by the level of creativity in the country. I am proud to be a Nigerian.

Do you have mentors in the business or people you look up to?

I respect the works of Mrs Temitayo Oyetunji of GOP Fashion. Her works inspires me.

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

Believe in yourself. Don’t give up on your dreams and sincerely ask God to help u achieve ur dreams.

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Jokotimi can be reached on 08038633545 or BB pin:26E9E351. You may also check her out on her Facebook page.

About her location, she says – “My workshop is at Agege but I don’t encourage people to come there. I’m working on a place where customers can go and buy off the shelf. Wholesale and retail options available. Call me and let’s talk business”.

I was tired of UK and US wears and I did something about it – Jokotimi Garba

 

 

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Creative Personality: Chika of Afrocentric Accessories

Someone in here is about to take the Fashion world by storm, I tell you. Chika is the dynamic brain behind a new and versatile line of accessories.

A passionate young man, his love for what he does is contagious. Chatting with him reminded me of this phrase – ‘If you can dream it, you can have it.’

The fashion status quo is getting transformed by the day. More Creatives are rising to the challenge and here we chat with one of the bolder ones. Enjoy!

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Chika Nwakanma. I am an entrepreneur and writer. I love the arts and sometimes like to fancy myself as an intellectual.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavor

Afrocentric accessories is a fashion brand that employs local fabrics to explore creative fashionable designs. We started operating November last year, and so far the journey has been quite interesting and educative. Like our motto says, we are bringing in the African style of global fashion. This we hope to achieve by using local materials, craft and fabrics to come up with indigenous African fashion accessories.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen?

I would not say I started off seeing myself as a creative individual. I just know that I was inquisitive and always wanted to do something different from what others were doing. I was the type of guy that would want to make his own path through the forest than following an already designated way. I always resented the pre-condition of life or social patterns in whatever form. It was later in life and through maturity that I recognized those as elements of creativity.

What source(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

Everything around me – my environment, the way people relate with each other, the way they react to things, the dress codes, just anything. I believe in making the most of what you have. Look at the environment and seek ways to exploit it, to create things. I am like a sponge, I soak up whatever artistic or innovative ideas I come in contact with.

Describe your journey so far

Like I said earlier, it has been an educative process, which I think is very important in my quest to grow as an individual. Things started off slowly, but they are picking up. Our designs are getting attention and acceptance from people; but there is still a lot to be done.

How did you start/ get into what you do now?

Well, I just got tired of the normal 9-5 kind of life. I wanted to control my own life and decide my own pace. I did not want to be at the whims of someone who calls himself my boss or at the mercy of a monthly salary. Besides I thought if I put in half the effort I put into working for someone for myself, I would be better off. Though, I always knew that it would not be an easy road.

Did you receive any training?

Yes. I received a little bit of training in beading while I was in NYSC camp, and thereafter I got trained on Ankara accessories.

Did you get discouraged at any point?

Yes. At a time, it felt like I was just spending my money on a futile venture. But you have to realize that business is like a school of life. You are tested in all areas. Your patience, prudence, creativity and even morality is tested as an entrepreneur, you have to learn to be patient, position yourself and implement your strategies. You have to learn how to swim against the tide. Calm waters don’t make good sailors. It’s only your passion that would keep you going when you are discouraged. Don’t get into it unless your heart is in it.

What made you stick with it?

Passion. The desire to see the fruition of one’s ideas. The satisfaction that comes with seeing how other people can value your creation and design. The need to break free of the corporate slave cycle.

What sets your work apart from others in your niche?

Quality. What is worth doing is worth doing well. But of course, one cannot go the extra mile unless he has a passion for that thing. At Afrocentric accessories, we stand out from other fashion brands, first with our particular bias to local fabrics, craft and textiles; then, there’s the professionalism in the finished work and the quality of our products.

We don’t aim to be the run-of-the-mill type of designer that goes with the trend. We intend to be pacesetters and creators. That is why we are coming up with designs that would challenge our creativity. We are breaking down fashion borders that have conscripted the use of Ankara, batik, kente, and other African fabrics to a very limited spectrum.

Where do you plan to take this to?

Global. Think Louis Vuitton, think Calvin Klein, think Salvatore…. then think Afrocentric. In fact, we aim to be the African response to those brands.

We want to show that the same way linen, cotton and silk are used to create a whole lot of clothing and accessories, so we can do with local fabrics. African fashion and textiles cannot be held to such relic in this global age. We have to explore creative and innovative ways to using and wearing local textile, which is what Afrocentric accessories is all about.

What hurdles have you encountered and how are you dealing with them?

Our fashion sense when it comes to local fabrics. People still think that if you wear an Ankara sneakers, you must match it. Women still think that an Ankara bag must go with a complimentary dress. This is the type of mentality we are trying to counter with our designs.

Then there is also the problem of skilled personnel. They do not deliver on time and are never short of excuses. I just don’t understand how people can be so complacent and nonchalant after collecting money for unrendered services.

What habits of yours would you say contribute to your creative output?

Inquisitiveness, the tendency  to find my own way instead of waiting or relying on other people, the willingness to try new ideas. All these contributed to my creative output

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

Nigerians are very creative people. There is no doubt about this. What I have a grouse with is the wastefulness of our creativity. We do not want to harness our potentials. We are always waiting for someone or something. Be it the government, pastor, miracle, rich relative, boyfriend, husband, children, wife, we are always passing the buck to someone else’s table. We do not want to accept responsibility for our lives or the outcome of it. The moment we begin to accept responsibility, things would change

Do you have a mentor in the business or people whose works you respect?

I do not have any mentor. But I admire the work of other designers. People like Christie Brown, Ava Morrison, Ohenma and Design for love. I also admire Estee Lauder for suceesfully managing 27 world class brands and the LVMH group which also owns over 30 brands including Thomas Pink, Moet & Chandon, Bulgari, Fendi, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Hennessy and others.

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

Never give up. It’s a fight to the finish. Today’s global brands were the products of someone’s idea. Why should yours be any different?

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And there you have the Afrocentric guy! Chika looks forward to your feedback and questions. Do make use of the comment box.

He may be contacted on +2348157605889 or +2348060793263. Email him on afrocentric.accessories2013@gmail.com. You need more of him – Visit www.afrocen3ic.com or make a stop at 5, Maduike way, Off Akerele road by randle junction, Surulere, Lagos.

‘I am like a sponge, I soak up whatever artistic or innovative ideas I come in contact with’ – Chika

Creative Personality: Sijuola Of Sijuolabeads & Add-ons

She is fondly called ‘Sijuola onileke’ (Sijuola, the beaded one). The story of this young woman – a former banker, now a business owner and employer of labor, will inspire you to be more and to do more.

We feature another example of the Nigerian youth, who have taken the courageous and high path of gainful self-employment, as against lobbying with scores of others for the limited, (and in many cases un-fulfilling) corporate jobs.

Here comes Sijuola! Her craftsmanship speaks for itself and her work speaks volumes. As in, prepare to be Wow’d!

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Sijuola Iyabo Olafusi, I am a graduate of Economics from the University of Ilorin, Kwara State. I am a mother, wife and an entrepreneur.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavour?

Sijuolabeads & Add-ons deals majorly in beaded jewelries, accessories and embellishments. We are into designing of accessories that add value to a woman’s fashion looks, things like necklaces, bracelets, clutch purses, bags, slippers, brooch, and hair accessories. We also make place-mats, bead flowers, table-mats, curtains and corporate insignia.

One of the major concepts behind Sijuolabeads and Add-ons was to break away from the norm because I realized that most people had this mindset that beaded accessories are mainly for traditional occasions. So I decided to make different types of beads that will be befitting for all kinds of occasions and styles of dressing, be it corporate wears, casual wears, smart casuals, or traditional attire.

We also empower youths and women through our basic and advanced training programs on bead making which gives them the opportunity to be business owners; and to pursue their passion for entrepreneurship with proper guidance and tutelage by us.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen?

Yes, I see myself as a creative person. Right from when I was a child, I loved to arrange things in beautiful patterns and adorn our sitting room with beautiful pieces. I generally just love to give the house a fresh look always. Thinking back now, I guess the introduction of knitting and sewing taught  in my primary school Home Economics class greatly fueled my passion for beading and other creative works that I do today.

I didn’t get any special training on bead making and still haven’t. I just find myself creating and designing accessories with beads as the idea comes to my mind. Many times, I even buy beads materials & accessories that I don’t need for any immediate project, just because they fascinate me. I know an opportunity to use them will arise sooner or later. No bead or accessory is ever a waste!

What sources(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

First and foremost, I get inspiration from the Almighty God. I also get inspired through my husband, colors, my environment and the internet.

Describe your journey so far?

I started out in 2007 after I concluded my National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) program and I was yet to be gainfully employed.

Interestingly, my first contact with beads was fortuitous through a sister friend that was involved in an accident around that time. She learnt about beading while recuperating in the hospital and as fate would have it, she would ask me to assist her with the beading anytime I go visiting. I used to oblige her reluctantly as I had no interest in it back then. It just so happened that since I had to visit her almost every day to assist in whatever she needs (which includes buying of bead materials), I gradually developed an interest in making beaded jewelry. Thereafter, I did a lot of research on the internet about beads and studied various beading techniques to develop myself.

Sijuolabeads & Add-ons started as a side venture in 2010  and it provided extra income for me as I would at my leisure; make beaded jewelry and accessories for my colleagues in the bank and friends. I also made insignia for various organisations.

I also got a lot of orders after people saw my wedding beads and accesories.  My husband advised me to brand my products and the name ‘Sijuolabeads & Add-ons’ came to be.

Did you get discouraged at any point?

Yeah, I did get discouraged a number of times when people price down my products, mostly because they know me personally.

At the point that I decided to become self-employed, I was very scared to resign because of the uncertainties, not to mention the fact that there is a lot of competition in the beading business.

What made you stick with it?

The uniqueness of my products made me stand out with lots of positive feedback from my customers and divine directions from God and those who believed in me.

My work has been well appreciated because it is different from the usual beaded accessories that are readily available in the market.

Where do you plan to take this to?

Haaaa! Of course, the sky is the limit. God has really favored me and I now understand fully what the bible passage means when it says, ‘…the gift of a man maketh room for him.’ Sijuolabeads & Add-ons is going to high places with the uniqueness and quality finishing of our products.

We intend to organize workshop/seminars for students to prepare them for the future; teach them that they do not need to look for ‘white collar’ jobs before they make it in life, and that they can earn a reasonable income through skill acquisition.

What habits of yours would you say contribute to your creative output?

Oh! I love to re-arrange things over and over again with the intent to create a new model and I also love paying attention to details. Hmmn, I guess these have spurred the creativity in my beading career.

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

We are trying a lot in Nigeria but need to acquire more knowledge. As you know, innovation is born out of necessity, therefore for us to increase the level of creativity in our society, we have to be proactive and think outside the box.

Do you have a mentor or people whose work you respect?

I don’t have a mentor per se but I respect the work of several craftsmen on the internet, most especially, my Facebook friend Biseok in Ukraine.

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

They should remain focused, be determined to succeed and above all, they should strive to learn as much as possible on any craft that they are passion about because knowledge is indeed power. Thereafter, they should create a plan and follow-through on how they intend to carve out a niche for themselves in their chosen endeavor.

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Sijuola looks forward to your feedback, questions and of course, patronage.

She can be reached on these numbers – 08056405970, 08133023655, 09092395542.       Email her on sijjy@yahoo.com or BBM Pin 741F9D9B

Go a step further and visit her workshop at – No. 66, Mafoluku Road, Off M’Muhammed Int’l Airport Road, Mafoluku Oshodi, Lagos.

I love to re-arrange things over and over again with the intent to create a new model – Sijuola

Creative Personality: Oluwakemi of DMCC Boxes

Valentine is upon us, another season of gifting and who better to get chatty with than the Creative Director of ‘DMCC Boxes’, where it is all about gifts and packages. I say she is in a class of her own, and you’ll soon find out why.

Dig in and feel free to re-package your plans for Valentine while you’re at it… I did 🙂

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Oluwakemi Adesona, a graduate of Business Administration & Management from the Federal Polytechnic, Auchi in Edo State. I am a wife, mother, mentor and ‘Mompreneur’ – because I work from Home.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavor

My business, DMCC BOXES, is simply about packaging. At DMCC BOXES, we specialize in making quality and creative card-boxes for packaging solutions that range from customized, branded boxes to the personalized varieties. We also empower interested minds through our training programs.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen?

Yes! Creativity oozes out of my pores, I have dabbled into catering, cake-making, bead-making, dressmaking etc., before I found my mettle/passion in box-making.

What source(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

My inspiration primarily, is from God. I also get inspired by designs I see on the internet, at events etc.

Describe your journey so far – How did you start/ get into what you do now?

Box –making for me is a calling, because I didn’t go to any school to learn it; everything I do is by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. The journey so far has been interesting and intriguing.

I didn’t get any formal training in the box-making craft, and still haven’t. I found myself being fascinated with any box that I came across; I developed this knack for carefully taking such boxes apart and trying to recreate them all over by piecing them together. I took all manners of boxes apart, none escaped me – the toothpaste carton, sugar carton, cough syrup carton, name it.

Strangely, I can’t recall how it all began but I know I resigned from my Job in 2007 to face my passion for making boxes squarely.

Did you get discouraged at any point?

Yeah! I did get discouraged several times, because I was frustrated with the pace at which the business was going; frustrated with the lack of creativity on the part of the importers of the materials I used for the boxes.

So what made you stick with it?

I stuck with it because of what the the Yorubas call “abinibi yato si ability” (please interpret it for me). I think it means what you are gifted at is different from what you learn… something like that. LOL.

Where do you plan to take this to?

Hmmmm, I’ve got seriously big plans ooh, I don’t know if I should let the cat out of the bag, yet… Well, all I will say is watch this space, but on a serious note, greater heights, a box manufacturing outfit, creating jobs for thousands of Nigerians.

With my box-making craft, I am gradually changing the mindset of people about how they present/package their products and gifts thus building a culture of boxing up our gifts or products not just wrapping it or bagging it.

What hurdles have you encountered and how are you dealing with them?

I have mentioned a few of the hurdles above…lack of variety in the designs of the cards ( used for building boxes), dearth of human resources or what you might call human capital flight, the very challenging environment entrepreneurs have to operate in etc.

What habits of yours would you say has contributed to your creative output?

Tenacity, a never give up attitude, and a knack for seeing opportunities instead of challenges.

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

Growing! More people are looking inwards now to know what it is they have been born to do and the gifting they have been endowed with to accomplish their true purpose.

Do you have mentors in the business or people you look up to?

Unfortunately, no…

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

Hold on, don’t give up, it will eventually pay. Just focus! Because “the world makes way for a man who knows where he is going”

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Oluwakemi will appreciate your comments and questions in the comment box. For consultation and engagements, she may be contacted via:

WhatsApp – 08083615870. Call/sms 08092223439,08051612990, 08034049740.  Email; dmccboxes@gmail.com, website; www.dmccboxes.org ; www.facebook.com/dmccboxes

Creativity oozes out of my pores – Kemi Adesona

Creative Personality: Olufunke of Pink Rubies Concept

I recently met this delectable young lady and she’s just full of ideas and creativity. She’s got quite a number of tricks up her sleeves as you will see, yet she was in the process of learning a new skill when I “discovered” her. Lol.

Read excerpts from my chat with her:

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Olufunke Mojisola Ogundimu, a beauty artist. I am a Computer Science graduate from Lagos State University. I run Pink Rubies Concept – a beauty Company.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavor

At Pink Rubies Concept, we offer a wide range of services- Beauty Make over, tying of headgear, sales of cosmetics and training. I have always been a business oriented person; I started out early during my secondary school days and as I grew older, I gathered some experience working with business owners. My love for the beauty industry made me start Pink Rubies Concept.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen?

Yes I see myself as a creative person.
I guess it has always been a part of me. Whilst growing up, I used to make patterns and stuff from cardboard, and I could knit bags and caps. During my university days I was into bead making. I would say my creativity level just got better with time and is still improving daily.

What source(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

I draw inspiration from everything around me – my Environment, incidences and God through his word.

Describe your journey so far – How did you get into what you do now?

I have always wanted to be an entrepreneur and I had to work with several business owners in order to understudy them. I read books on starting a business and listened to talks as well.

Then I needed to decide on what business I would settle for. I wanted one that comes to me naturally and didn’t feel like work. My options included jewelry making, event planning, clothing line and make up. With prayers and all I settled for the beauty industry. Also, I chose make up because people were always asking if I was a makeup artist (I guess my personal make up always looked good to them). Plus my friends always wanted me to help with their make up when going out and I really enjoyed doing it.) That is how I started PINK RUBIES CONCEPT.

I registered pink rubies concept in april 2012, I enrolled for an intensive makeover training in june 2012, did my 1st bridal job in october 2012. I resigned from my former place of work, a clothing company, in dec 2012 after I made up my mind to face Pink Rubies fully.

Did you get discouraged at any point?

Yes, a lot. Because I had tried my hands at different businesses, people were like ‘is she into make up again?’ LOL! Some people even advised me to look out for something else because it’s a saturated industry.

What made you stick with it?

My passion for the art of makeup and the smiles I get from satisfied clients kept me going.

And where do you plan to take this to?

I plan to take it to the highest point, where my services would be rendered worldwide. Pink Rubies Concept is going to be a WORLD CLASS BRAND.

What hurdles have you encountered and how are you dealing with them?

At the beginning, gaining the trust of clients, but it’s better now and with more time we wouldn’t need to campaign much as our jobs would speak for themselves. Also, getting the right set of people that share similar values to join my team. It seems many people are in it just for the money and are not bothered about excellent service delivery.

What habits of yours would you say contribute to your creative output?

I would say my attitude. It says, ‘never give up no matter what.’ And ‘whatever is worth doing is worth doing well.’ I don’t joke with excellence. If I have to do it I give it my best shot.

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

The level of creativity in our society has improved tremendously… People are taking risks and doing what wouldn’t have been done before and that has helped stamped our country on the world map. At the rate we’re going, the sky is just the beginning.

Do you have a mentor in the business or people whose work you respect?

I look up to people who were the first to give a face to our industry and have taken it to great heights; someone like Tara.
My very own mentor is Oluwaseun of my dazzle pro, I love her spirit and passion.

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

Never give up, put in all your best and energy in doing what you do. The universe always finds a way of rewarding and making it work for you even beyond your expectations.

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There you have her, our first make-up artist on the forum – Pink Rubies Concept. She looks forward to your remarks and questions. Do make use of the comment box.

She may be reached on 08032798416 and 08121343080. You may also E-mail her on pinkrubiesconcept@gmail.com

 I don’t joke with excellence. If I have to do it I give it my best shot – Olufunke Pink Rubies

Creative Personality Profile: HOLU of Holucentric27

With great excitement, I present to you the maiden edition of our Creative Personality Profiles as we roll into the next phase of this creative project! We will be hosting some inspiring talents on these pages and I assure you, you are in for a roller coaster ride.

My encounter with Holu’s work on a social platform was purely by chance. They immediately struck me as great pieces that came from some deep place inside their craftsman. Further investigation of the personality behind them revealed a multi-talented and greatly inspired young lady.

Well, grab your pop corn and let’s discover together – HOLU: the great mind behind the brand.

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We’d love to meet you

My name is Afolabi Oluwaseun Olamide, popularly know as Holu. I graduated with a first class degree in Economics in 2007 and I obtained a Masters degree in Finance and Economics from the University of Manchester in 2010. I am the 11th child and last daughter of my parents. I am a fashion lover and the CEO of ‘Holucentric27’. I also am the personal assistant to Kolawole Oyeyemi, the senior pastor of the Chapel of Uncommon Grace.

Give a brief introduction of your business endeavor

Holucentric27 is a one stop fashion house where we provide make up services, design and make trendy outfits, and also make shoes and accessories. I do not see my business as a local one but a conglomerate and a company that will employ thousands some day; a company that will determine what is acceptable or not in the fashion industry. I have also done a bit of modeling and I plan to have my own agency one day.

Do u see yourself as a creative individual and at what point did this happen? 

I am all about fashion and style because it’s a way of expression for me and it’s what I enjoy and do effortlessly. I see myself as a creative person and I’m definitely not scared to try new things like cutting my hair, dyeing it red or gold or blond; whatever works with the look I’m trying to create per time. I just go for it without a care in the world. LOL

What source(s) do you draw your inspiration from?

I draw inspiration from several places. I follow a lot of fashion and style programs, blogs, and I pay attention to events around me. Whenever I can’t get something that I want, I just create it. Most importantly I have these flashes in the night when I can’t sleep. LOL. So my inspiration comes from God.

Describe your journey so far

I have always loved fashion and coming from a family with many children, I never liked wearing the same thing with my siblings. I always went in a different direction, I chose my fabric and designed my outfits and yes, they always cost more. People loved to see what I would come up with next and what I would be wearing. I gained confidence from the fact that even if I wear synthetic rubber, people never saw it as that, but a unique fashion piece and they always told me I could make rags look stylish. LOL.

I made my first real sketch of an outfit when I was to be the chief bridesmaid for my sister and it was a mint green dress with a cap sleeve and uneven ends. By 2006 I was a pro in sketching, and by 2009 I decided to go to a fashion school to learn how to transform my designs into real dresses because I was always dissatisfied when tailors make my dresses. I had a strong desire to have a one stop fashion house where clients can come in and get all they wanted in the same space, so I took a course on make-up artistry and I ventured into designing shoes and making accessories. From this point onward, I started doing a business plan and here I am today 🙂

Did you get discouraged at some point?

Discouragement has never been for me because I’ve always known it’s a God-given gift and all I have done has come from Gods leading. So not for one day have I felt discouraged. Rather, every set back has made me push harder, spending more on training to get better at all times.

What hurdles have you encountered and how are you dealing with them?

I have faced several challenges starting from having a lot of financial constraints and that was a major hurdle, but now my finances are more stable and so not an hindrance per se. It’s still a factor though, but not for much longer now.

Where do you plan to take this to?

The plan is to have my website and a YouTube channel where I talk about fashion and style and teach people about the original African way; to revere our heritage instead of copying the white.

What habits of yours would you say contribute to your creative output?

Persistence, diligence and patience are key habits that contribute to what I do and who I am because I would gladly stay up all night to achieve or get something done. An eye for beauty and a desire to be the best in all I set out to do, are also contributing factors. Most importantly, having God in my life helps me to never doubt myself, or pay much attention to what people say or think, especially if it’s coming from a place that is false.

Do you have mentors in the industry or people you look up to?

I have key people that I look up to; for make up it is Tai -Lo, her work is very inspirational. For clothing, I have so many of them on both local and international fronts because no one designer has all the elements that I look out for, so I pick bits here and there, but VOGUE is a major inspiration to me because I see my business and company growing to be better than them and becoming the hub of the fashion industry in the world.

How do you see the level of creativity and innovation in our society?

Today the level of creativity has really improved but it also got wild; where going nude is now fashion or going sheer is fashionable. I strongly believe that we don’t need to become mad people to express ourselves or to stay fabulous and beautiful. We can stay covered up and be all we wanna be. I’m not sure what the definition of creativity in our world is any more and this is what I want to change; to restore sanity into our world through fashion and in the process safe guard the future and mindset of our youth and everyone in general. You don’t need to be vulgar, sexist, or go stark naked before you can be accepted by your peers or be considered a stylish person.

How would you encourage aspiring creative business owners?

For the business owner, never get discouraged, keep pushing and be driven by a higher purpose beyond starting a business for the sake of just making money. For everything there is a time and a purpose. If you sow rightly, you will definitely reap; so stay focused and believe in what you do and know for sure why you do what you do.

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….. And there you have heard from Holu of Holucentric27. Quite the dynamo, isn’t she? She looks forward to your feedback and engagements. She can be reached on  +2348066960663 or via email: oluwaseun_afolabi23@yahoo.co.uk. She may also be reached on her Facebook page www.facebook.com/holu.wow

Please use the comment box to share your views as well as any question you may have for her. Cheers 🙂

 Whenever I can’t get something that I want, I just create it ~ HOLU